Divorce Can Hurt Your Children

Divorce  Impacts The Emotional State of Your Child

It is also the time when an intervention can take place. Divorce is extremely difficult for a child to understand and cope with. Many young children often report that their “world is falling apart.” It really is if you think about it. Their emotional safety is at risk and they wonder, “Where will I live? Who will take care of me? Do mom and dad still love me? Is this my fault?” These are only a few questions that go through children’s minds during this emotional time.

As you move through your own emotional roller-coaster with the divorce, slow down for a minute and focus your attention where it belongs — on your children. When we don’t, both our own and our children’s emotional stability are at risk. As children begin to slip away, your role as a parent to comfort them becomes much harder.

Anger is an overwhelming and powerful emotion. Often times it clouds our thinking, especially when a marriage is breaking up. Trust me when I say that as much as you think you are hiding your feelings towards your spouse from your kids, they “sense it happening.”

Last week in a session with a family, I asked a 9-year-old child, “If I could grant you three wishes, what would they be?”

She did not wish for a new computer, clothes, or an IPod. She stated, “I noticed that my mom and dad do not say ‘I love you’ to each other anymore. I wish they would do this more.” Our children know and feel what we are experiencing but they often do not say it.

As you all know, I am a firm believer in talking and being honest with children. I practice this with my own children and it has made a significant and positive impact on their emotional well being. My son is able to express his feelings openly and honestly with me when he is upset. Am I tooting my horn and saying, “I am the best parent in the world? No, I am simply trying to share with you what has worked for me.

Ann Landers once said, “It is not what you do for your children, but what you have taught them to do for themselves, that will make them successful human beings.” I love and believe that quote because it can apply to so many aspects of our children’s lives.

If you are going through a divorce and you are struggling with how to talk to your children about this, begin by “talking” to them. Teach them that it is okay to be upset about what is going on. Give them a voice to come to you when they are upset, and share with them that you are upset that this is happening (if it’s is true). Do not keep secrets from your children. This is not protective! it is destructive, and it will not help you or your child.

Teach your children that, “Things happen in life that we do not expect but we have the TOOLS to move through them! Be your children’s tool!

When you are getting divorced, you must put your children first. As you move through your own emotional roller-coaster with the divorce, slow down for a minute and focus your attention where it belongs — on your children. When we don’t, both our own and our children’s emotional stability are at risk.

Dr. Sue Cornbluth is a nationally recognized parenting expert in high conflict parenting situations. She is a regular mental health contributor for an array of networks and television shows such as NBC, FOX and CBS. Dr. Sue has also contributed to several national publications. Her new best-selling book, Building Self Esteem in Children and Teens Who Are Adopted or Fostered is available now. To find out more about her work, please visit Dr. Sue’s website.

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